Shameless Self-Promotion – Recaps and Summaries

So it occurred to me after over 200 blog entries that I may have buried the lead – that is, I’m a writer and would very much like people to read what I write.  Hence, the existence of this blog to promote my writing.  I can assure you I am better at writing than I am at self-promotion (Facebook still doesn’t think I’m real).

“What do you write, S.J.?” I imagine one of you lovely readers asking me (don’t spoil it).
“Well,” (I wouldn’t be very articulate in real life) I would answer after a moment of embarrassment, “I write a lot of stuff but what I’m trying to market are my stories about Nevermore and the Ravens.”
“Did you just use the word ‘market’ like a corporate shill?” my imaginary audience may respond.
“Um.”
“Well?”
“Yes, yes I did,” I would be forced to admit.  “But all starving artists desire to one day not be starving.  I mean, sure, they want to make great art, but also they want to, you know, be able to quit their day jobs and still be able to eat.”
“Wait, that’s really the dream?” my imaginary readership asks.
“The dream is really fame and fortune, but the desperate hope is for enough recognition to make writing a full-time job,” I would answer.  “I am at the desperate hope phase.  Please listen to my pitch.”
“Okay, desperate writer, make your pitch.  What’s Nevermore and the Ravens?” my imaginary audience would ask, kindly taking pity on my desperate state.
“Nevermore and the Ravens is the name of an indie rock band that has supernatural misadventures.”
“That sounds like ‘Josie and the Pussycats.’”
“Um, possibly, but I’m really more inspired by Scooby Doo,” I would answer, since I don’t want to be accused of plagiarism.
“Same thing.”
“Scooby Doo is the original.  And I’ve got a twist!”
“The supernatural is real,” my imaginary but clever conversation partner would say.
“Er, yes, but they know the supernatural is real.  Two of the four of them can even use magic!”
“Does everyone know the supernatural is real?”
“No,” I would answer.  “That provides conflict!”
“Okay, so what’s the plot of your novels?” my imaginary audience asks.
“Actually, Necromancy for the Greater Good and the sequel Paranormal is Relative are collections of short stories.  Thirteen short stories!”
“Of course,” my imaginary audience would reply, because that was kind of obvious.  “Also, stop using so many exclamation points.”
I would concede that is probably a good idea.  “I also include a framing device to tie the stories together and the lyrics for each song.”
“That seems different enough to hold my interest,” says the imaginary audience.  “What kind of stories?  Funny?  Horror?”
“Mostly serious with some funny bits, but some are silly with serious bits, and some are just serious.  I like to be unpredictable.  Also, I have a fickle Muse so my inspiration can be all over the place as far as tone.”
“So what are your inspirations?” the now engaged audience asks.
“Well, I draw from my life because I can’t help that, but also draw from pop culture, and when that fails, I make stuff up.  Actually, I have a blog that pretty much explains that.  But in short, I draw from fantasy, science fiction, comic books, other pop culture, myth and legend, and classic literature.  I also love a good pun.”
“There’s no such thing as a good pun.”
“We’ll have to agree to disagree,” I would say, “So please read my stuff.  I have links!”
“Sure, what the heck,” my imaginary conversation partner would say, thus ending the interview.

I can write other stuff and I do.  This blog is evidence of that.  However, as much as I need to vent my spleen about horrible comic book stories and disappointing movies, I don’t think that’s marketable.  Nor do I think my entries on writing on marketable either, although I think a good bout of self-introspection is good for me.  But I think my short stories are marketable, and I’m going to continue to work on them.  Maybe one day I can get past the desperate hope phase and live the dream…

Advertisements

Published by

awritershailmarypass

S. J. Drew is an aspiring writer who finally entered the blogosphere to shamelessly promote that writing (as evidenced by the title of the blog). Whether or not this works remains to be seen, but S. J. hopes you are at least entertained. And if you're actually reading this, that's probably a good sign.

2 thoughts on “Shameless Self-Promotion – Recaps and Summaries”

  1. “However, as much as I need to vent my spleen about horrible comic book stories and disappointing movies, I don’t think that’s marketable.”

    Tell that to Chris Sims and Linkara. 😉

    And hang in there. I’ve been running my blog for four years now and you’d think I’d have more followers or hits than I actually do. -_-;

    1. I am a fan of both Chris Sims and Linkara. I even emailed Linkara a fan letter and I was sad I didn’t get a reply. Some days my geekiness embarrasses even me.

      We’ll both hang in there and hope for the best. To paraphrase the great philosopher Yakko Warner – It’s a great big internet and we’re all really tiny 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s